Our research

We work together to understand cardiac biology and disease mechanisms through translational research.

Scientific strategy | Research groups | Research projects

 

Understanding the heart for the benefit of patients

The Institute for Experimental Medical Research (IEMR) is Norway’s largest institute for translational cardiac research.

The Institute is a department within the University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, and operates within the framework of the Research strategy of the Division of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Diseases.

IEMR staff holds competency from a wide range of medical and life science disciplines and covers molecular to clinical research. Our aim is to understand cardiac biology and disease mechanisms through translational research and develop new preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic strategies for patients with heart disease.

High impact publications

IEMR is focused on delivering high-quality science, published in leading scientific journals. As top-level journals prioritize articles reporting highly novel findings on topics of broad interest, we develop our projects accordingly. Indeed, we advance projects that address key questions in cardiac (patho)physiology and translational science, which combine outside-the-box thinking and state-of-the-art technologies.

Examples of our recent successes include publications in esteemed journals such as Circulation Research, Circulation, and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. For a complete list of recently published articles, see all publications.

Top level teaching and training

We place great focus on training our researchers to become independent experts of the future. Our employees come from diverse backgrounds, with varied experience in cardiac anatomy and methodologies. With local experts available to dedicate time to training our new employees, we have established an excellent teaching environment that develops and nurtures cardiac researchers.

The IEMR hosts courses in varied cardiac methodologies and our employees lecture on national PhD and Masters courses. Our employees also learn how to communicate their research to different audiences through developing presentation skills and engagement on media platforms.

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Impact on the Norwegian healthcare system

Since its establishment in 1951, IEMR has made a significant impact on the Norwegian healthcare system. Many former students at IEMR have become leaders at all levels of hospitals and other healthcare institutions all over Norway.

Furthermore, results and methods established through research at IEMR have contributed to improvements in diagnostics and treatment of patients in Norway and internationally.

Today, ongoing projects initiated by or performed in collaboration with researchers at IEMR contribute to quality improvements in the clinical departments at Oslo University Hospital and other hospitals, directly through new knowledge, as well as indirectly through increased rigor and systematic approach in everyday clinical activities.

See all ongoing projects

Excellent working environment

IEMR welcomes the best research talents from Norway and the rest of the world.

At IEMR we believe that a mix of passionate clinicians and basic scientists produces excellence in research. The institute employs people from all around the world with backgrounds spanning from mathematics and physics, to molecular biology and medicine.

IEMR prioritizes the welfare and wellbeing of its employees, as a part of our strategy to promote excellence. Every two years we visit other excellent research groups abroad, with a dual aim to learn from the best and get to know our colleagues even better.

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Regional core facilities

Our advanced core facilities for Preclinical PET Imaging, Preclinical MR, Advanced Light Microscopy and Large Animal Research, offer state-of-the-art equipment for conducting experimental analyses, along with a highly qualified staff.

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IEMR in numbers:

7
Research groups
12
Postdocs
28
PhD students
71
Employees
165
Doctoral thesis
1306
Publications