Stokke group: Translational arrhythmology and electrophysiology

Stokke group

We aim to understand processes that lead to cardiac disease due to pathological electrophysiology, especially arrhythmias. Our goal is that this insight will lead to improved diagnostics and therapy for patients with cardiac disease.

Our translational research team work to unravel fundamental principles of cardiac electrophysiology, in order to provide a better understanding and management of clinical conditions caused by abnormal electrical activity in the heart. We use observations from patients as the outset for our laboratory experiments, and test key findings in large animal models and clinical situations.

 

We want to be able to predict and prevent triggers of arrhythmic events, and to provide a basis for the use of exercise for electrophysiological remodeling in a safe manner. We especially focus on the role of calcium handling by cardiac proteins associated with the sarcoplasmic reticulum, such as RyR2, SERCA2 and CaMKII. To better understand the role of these proteins, we use rodent models of heart failure, CPVT, HCM and ischemia-reperfusion.

 

We combine clinical observations and interventions with molecular biology, cellular electrophysiology, Langendorff-perfused hearts and in vivo characterization by echocardiography, MRI and telemetric ECG recording. We also expose rodent models to exercise training by voluntary running in resistance-controlled running wheels and treadmills. As part of this strategy, we collaborate closely with other research groups with expertise on basic research methods, clinical electrophysiology, cardiac imaging and cardiogenetics. This provides us the opportunity to understand biological processes involved in pathological electrophysiology on a molecular, cellular, organ and organism level.

Group leader Mathis Korseberg Stokke is Professor I at UiO and Consultant Cardiologist at the Arrhythmia Unit, Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet. He is also Deputy Director of NORHEART – The Norwegian PhD School of Heart Research. He leads a research group with researchers of different academic backgrounds and specific know-how, from nanotechnology and molecular biology to clinical training in cardiology. The group also collaborates closely with clinicians and researchers at Oslo University Hospital, and with international collaborators in the US, Germany and UK.

 

Group Leader

Mathis Korseberg Stokke

Head of Department & Group Leader & Professor & Senior Consultant

Group members

Kristine Andreassen

Doctoral Research Fellow

Mani Sadredini

Doctoral Research Fellow

Marie Haugsten Hansen

Doctoral Research Fellow

Petter Mikal Johansen Skar

Medical Research Curriculum Student

Simon Girmai Berger

Medical Research Curriculum Student

Stine Aagaard-Nilsen

Medical Research Curriculum Student

Tristan Hellstrand

Medical Research Curriculum Student

Latest publications

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Rypdal KB, Olav Melleby A, Robinson EL, Li J, Palmero S, Seifert DE, Martin D, Clark C, López B, Andreassen K, Dahl CP, Sjaastad I, Tønnessen T, Stokke MK, Louch WE, González A, Heymans S, Christensen G, Apte SS, Lunde IG (2022)
ADAMTSL3 knock-out mice develop cardiac dysfunction and dilatation with increased TGFβ signalling after pressure overload
Commun Biol, 5 (1), 1392
PubMed 36539599 DOI 10.1038/s42003-022-04361-1
Haugsten Hansen M, Sadredini M, Hasic A, Anderson ME, Sjaastad I, Korseberg Stokke M (2022)
CaMKII and reactive oxygen species contribute to early reperfusion arrhythmias, but oxidation of CaMKIIδ at methionines 281/282 is not a determining factor
J Mol Cell Cardiol, 175, 49-61
PubMed 36528076 DOI 10.1016/j.yjmcc.2022.12.002
Rixon C, Andreassen K, Shen X, Erusappan PM, Almaas VM, Palmero S, Dahl CP, Ueland T, Sjaastad I, Louch WE, Stokke MK, Tønnessen T, Christensen G, Lunde IG (2022)
Lumican accumulates with fibrillar collagen in fibrosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
ESC Heart Fail
PubMed 36444917 DOI 10.1002/ehf2.14234
Andreassen K, Dejgaard LA, Lie Ø, Fink TS, Lunde IG, Edvardsen T, Haugaa KH, Stokke MK (2022)
Exercise training during childhood and adolescence is associated with favorable diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Int J Cardiol, 364, 65-71
PubMed 35714718 DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2022.06.042
Harbo MB, Stokke MK, Sjaastad I, Espe EKS (2022)
One step closer to myocardial physiology: From PV loop analysis to state-of-the-art myocardial imaging
Acta Physiol (Oxf), 234 (2), e13759
PubMed 34978759 DOI 10.1111/apha.13759
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