Louch group: Cardiomyocyte function in health and disease

Louch group

Our research is aimed at understanding abnormal cellular calcium handling, with focus on the structures and proteins that control calcium cycling.

Cardiac function is tightly controlled by the contraction and relaxation of these cells; processes which are in turn reliant on carefully controlled calcium homeostasis. Indeed, cardiac dysfunction during diseases such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation can often be traced to abnormal cellular calcium handling.

Our research is aimed at understanding these abnormalities, with focus on the structures and proteins that control calcium cycling. How are these structures and proteins put together during development, and what causes them to disassemble during disease? What is the consequence of such alterations? To examine these questions, we combine molecular biology and electrophysiology techniques with advanced 3D imaging (super-resolution, confocal, and electron microscopy).

Ultimately, we strive to mechanistically link subcellular structure and calcium handling to whole-heart function, and to reverse dysfunction during disease for the benefit of patients.

Group leader William (Bill) Louch is a Professor of Medicine and Head of the Core Facility for Advanced Light Microscopy. He currently holds a Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council which was initiated in 2015. His group’s research is focused on understanding the structure and function cardiac muscle cells.

Group Leader

William (Bill) Louch

Group Leader & Professor

Group members

Adelle Basson

Doctoral Research Fellow

Anna Bergan Dahl

Doctoral Research Fellow

Christopher Le

Researcher without PhD

Harmonie Perdreau-Dahl

Postdoctoral fellow

Jia Li

Postdoctoral fellow

Martin Laasmaa

Postdoctoral fellow

Michael Frisk

Postdoctoral fellow

Ornella Manfra

Postdoctoral fellow

Per Kristian Lunde

Senior Researcher

Simona Kavaliauskiene

Postdoctoral fellow

Victoria Becker

Doctoral Research Fellow

Xin Shen

Postdoctoral fellow

Yufeng Hou

Postdoctoral fellow

Latest publications

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Frisk M, Norseng PA, Stenersen Espe EK, Louch WE (2022)
Tubulator: an automated approach to analysis of t-tubule and dyadic organization in cardiomyocytes
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci, 377 (1864), 20210468
PubMed 36189810 DOI 10.1098/rstb.2021.0468
Zhang X, Smith CER, Morotti S, Edwards AG, Sato D, Louch WE, Ni H, Grandi E (2022)
Mechanisms of spontaneous Ca2+ release-mediated arrhythmia in a novel 3D human atrial myocyte model: II Ca2+ -handling protein variation
J Physiol
PubMed 36114707 DOI 10.1113/JP283602
Zhang X, Ni H, Morotti S, Smith CER, Sato D, Louch WE, Edwards AG, Grandi E (2022)
Mechanisms of spontaneous Ca2+ release-mediated arrhythmia in a novel 3D human atrial myocyte model: I. Transverse-axial tubule variation
J Physiol
PubMed 36094888 DOI 10.1113/JP283363
Støle TP, Lunde M, Shen X, Martinsen M, Lunde PK, Li J, Lockwood F, Sjaastad I, Louch WE, Aronsen JM, Christensen G, Carlson CR (2022)
The female syndecan-4-/- heart has smaller cardiomyocytes, augmented insulin/pSer473-Akt/pSer9-GSK-3β signaling, and lowered SCOP, pThr308-Akt/Akt and GLUT4 levels
Front Cell Dev Biol, 10, 908126
PubMed 36092718 DOI 10.3389/fcell.2022.908126
Shen X, van den Brink J, Bergan-Dahl A, Kolstad TR, Norden ES, Hou Y, Laasmaa M, Aguilar-Sanchez Y, Quick AP, Espe EKS, Sjaastad I, Wehrens XHT, Edwards AG, Soeller C, Louch WE (2022)
Prolonged β-adrenergic stimulation disperses ryanodine receptor clusters in cardiomyocytes and has implications for heart failure
Elife, 11
PubMed 35913125 DOI 10.7554/eLife.77725
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